Internet

03.03.2013

Kim H. Veltman

Towards a Meaningful Web of Knowledge

"Computer Engineering and Innovations in Education for Virtual Learning Environments, Intelligent Systems and Communicability: Multimedia Mobile Technologies, Experiences in Research and Quality Educational Trends" (Informatics and Emerging Excellence in Education collection). Brescia: Blue Herons Editions. Series Volume: I, 2013. ISBN: 978-88-96471-14-2. DOI: 10.978.8896471/142. In Press.

Abstract

Initial visions of the Internet were about complete access to all knowledge. Thus far, these visions have been hampered by three forms of compromises: technological, conceptual and an object focus. There are also implicit contradictions in the ways we organize and search for information and knowledge on the Web. We want to find something particular and yet we use single words, which are universal. The semantic web entails only subsumptive relations: what and who. Needed is a fuller approach that treats who as living entities, separate from what, and includes determinative and ordinal relations which are basic aspects of human life and knowledge: where, when, how, and why.

This paper outlines a new approach to linking knowledge in four stages: 1) connecting letters, words and terms with their particulars: attributes and relations; 2-3) linking these with their sources and with alternative sources, 4) linking these with questions such that personal (who), geo- (where), temporal (when), conditional (how) and causal (why) subsets can more readily be found. It suggests linkology as a new tool in determining the veracity of claims and points to a new Knowledge Coding Classification (KCC).         

1. Introduction

Initial visions of the Internet were about complete access to all knowledge. Thus far, these visions have been hampered by three forms of compromises: technological, conceptual and an object focus. First, early technological compromises brought limitations to this vision. The World Wide Web (WWW) revived the initial vision with a quest of theoretically linking anything with everything. Then conceptual compromises again brought limitations to this vision, by focussing on the born digital realm, and through a particular definition of semantics. Third, an emerging quest for an Internet of Things, is introducing new compromises in its fixation on things (objects).  

There are also implicit contradictions in the ways we organize and search for information and knowledge on the Web. We want to find something particular and yet we use single words, which are universal. Linking is a key. Linking truples is insufficient because these entail only subsumptive relations: what things are, isolated from determinative and ordinal relations: who, where, when, how and why as aspects of human life and knowledge.

This paper outlines a new approach to knowledge in four stages. First, in addition to using truples to connect universals via is and has, we need to link letters, words, terms, and names with their particulars: attributes and relations. Second, each of these needs to be linked with their sources. Third, because there are multiple sources, with changing opinions and claims over time and space, the linked attributes and relations need to be geo-temporally referenced to reflect different and even contradictory sources. Fourth, in order to make the immensity of this information and knowledge accessible this corpus of links needs to be linked with questions such that personal (who), geo- (where), temporal (when), conditional (how) and causal (why) subsets can more readily be found.

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