Networks

03.12.2003

Kim H. Veltman

GEANT and Grids for E-Culture, Art History and Museum Studies

GÉANT and Grid Infrastructures for Research Users, Brussels: European Commission, 2003 (In press).

1. The Community
2. Synergies with other Research User Communities
3. General Importance of Computing and Networks in Application Area
4. Geographical Coverage
5. Case Studies
6. How Grids Can Change Ways of Working

1. The Community

There are three basic communities, namely, 1) cultural organizations (museums, libraries and archives), which have content and for which they provide basic context; 2) research institutions, which provide context and communication for the content along with some software and 3) industry, which provides hardware and software for context and communication, and provides ways of exploiting content.

2. Synergies with other Research User Communities

There are communities concerned with conservation and restoration of cultural objects, monuments, sites and landscapes that would benefit from better access to the content of other cultural institutions as well as the context of research institutions and conversely. The content of cultural organizations, especially with respect to historical film, video, television music and documentaries on festivals has profound potentials for e-creativity including those covered by the artnouveau TN and ultimately e-entertainment (cf. Cybernarium). There are important synergies if the results of these research communities can affect application areas such as e-learning and e-tourism.

3. General Importance of Computing and Networks in Application Area

The creation of high-level digital surrogates of cultural objects (paintings, rare books) means that they can be studied in detail without threat to the original. Using techniques such as stereo-lithography one can simulate intervention on unique objects in order that these surrogates can inform decisions re: conservation, preservation, and restoration. These surrogates can also be in the form of three-dimensional virtual environments for reconstructions of buildings and sites, which can then be used for the creative industries (e.g. television), e-entertainment, e-tourism and e-learning. Virtual reconstructions of cities can be used to trace historical change and test hypotheses concerning economic, social and other history. A new concept of Virtual Heritage Centres (VHCs) proposed by Maurizio Forte (CNR-ITABC) can serve as a prototype to link and integrate these communities.


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