• Perspective

Perspective

01.12.1995

Kim H. Veltman

Electronic Media, The Rebirth of Perspective and the Fragmentation of Illusion.

Opening Keynote: Munich, Marstall Theater and Siemens Foundation, Inaugural Lecture: “Elektronische Medien, Die Wiedergeburt der Perspektive und die Fragmentierung der Perspektive”: International Conference: Illusion und Simulation, Munich, March 1994.
Published as: “Elektronische Medien, Die Wiedergeburt der Perspektive und die Fragmentierung der Perspektive”: Illusion und Simulation, ed. Stefan Iglhaut, Florian Rötzer, Elisabeth Schweeger, Munich: Cantz Verlag, 1995, pp. 26-48.
Reprinted as: "Electronic Media, The Rebirth of Perspective and the Fragmentation of Illusion": Electronic Culture: Technology and Visual Representation, ed. Timothy Druckrey, New York: Aperture, pp. 208-227.

1. Introduction
2. Renaissance Themes
3. Transformations
4. Inside-Outside
5. Correspondence and Non-Correspondence
    - Theoretical Correspondence
    - Assumed Correspondence
    - Possible Correspondence
    - Transposed Correspondence
    - No Direct Correspondence
6. Virtual Reality in External and Internal Worlds
7. Fragmentation of Illusion
8. New Veracity Tests
9. Conclusions

1. Introduction
In the first decades of the twentieth century a number of famous artists abandoned traditional spatial techniques and experimented with new forms of art: cubism, expressionism, abstract expressionism. Some critics believed that these experiments heralded a new period of non-figurative art. For instance, Novotny1 claimed that scientific perspective had ended with Cezanne. Arnason2, in his standard history of modern art, spread this view that perspective had died in the early twentieth century.3 In retrospect it is clear that non-figurative art has become a new alternative rather than replacing all the earlier goals of art. Realism has not died: it has taken on new forms: including surrealism, hyper-realism, and super-realism. As a result, although there was a significant drop in the publications on perspective from 1914 to 1945 (during and between the two great wars), since then the number of books on perspective has continued to rise. Indeed more books have been published on the subject in this century than during the fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth centuries combined.


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